Tag Archives: Georgetown University

This Day in History 1/23: The Founding of Georgetown University

English: The proposal to establish an academy ...

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Sure, this isn’t exactly Earth-shattering history for most of you, but it certainly is to me.

On January 23, 1789,  John Carroll, Robert Molyneux and John Ashton completed the purchase from Threlkeld and William Deakins, Jr. for “seventy five pounds current money” about an acre and a half of land at Georgetown Heights in Maryland for construction of an academy.  Carroll, a former Jesuit who was the first Roman Catholic bishop in the United States, wrote that  

“We shall begin the building of our Academy this summer. On this Academy are built all my hopes of permanency and success of our holy religion in the United States.”

Carroll had succeeded beyond his wildest expectations.

Founded simply as a school to foster Catholic education in an overwhelmingly Protestant nation, Georgetown University is the oldest Catholic university in the United States.  Its programs in government, international affairs and law are world-renowned.  Its alumni include numerous members of Congress, Senate, and Supreme Court Justices.  It includes heads of state from over a dozen countries and one US President (Bill Clinton).

It was the site of numerous movies and television shows, such as The Exorcist and St. Elmo’s Fire.

Oh yeah, it also has  a pretty good basketball team, too.

Yet most importantly, it is my alma mater, and I do mean it literally.  I learned an awful lot at the Hilltop, and not just about government and history.  My four years at Georgetown were an exercise in self-determination and discovery, and I will never forget my time here.

So if I’m being selfish with this Day in History, I really don’t care…especially if you’re an Orangeman.

…and if you are, I have a certain finger lifted for you ;)

Georgetown University today

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100 Years of Georgetown Basketball

100 Years of Georgetown Basketball

Even though the team took a drubbing this weekend against Notre Dame, and what looks like another tonight against West Virginia, I’m still proud of being a Georgetown Hoya.

I’m working on some curricular stuff this week, so I may be a little more sporadic than usual.  Today is a new video on Hulu, a documentary on Georgetown University’s basketball program on its 100th anniversary, in 2007.  Please enjoy the video, and definitely show it to classrooms where the kids aspire to great heights on the hardcourt. The link is above, as I can’t get the Hulu stuff embedded on this platform.

If you find an unpolished gem I can send to the recruiters, let me know.  Anything to help the program.

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Unknown African-American Heroes: The Healy Family of Georgia

February is Black History Month, and the Neighborhood will be highlighting some African-Americans that may not readily come to mind for students. 

First off is a family from Georgia that achieved many notable firsts as African-Americans, even though many Blacks still belittle their accomplishments, due to their mixed lineage and religion.  In 1818, Michael Morris Healy emigrated from Ireland and settled in the “bottom” country of Jones County, Georgia, near the town of Macon.  He would become a successful cotton planter, with 1,500 acres and 49 enslaved Africans.  Among them was a 16 year old girl named Mary Eliza, who Healy took as his common-law wife in 1829.  Even though their “marriage” was illegal, they lived as husband and wife, rearing 10 children.

It is these children, these “bastard” children of an illegal union that are the heart of this story.  Under Georgia law, children of slaves and masters were considered enslaved, and thus prohibited from receiving an education.  The Healys were thus educated in northern schools and abroad, always in strict adherence to their father’s Roman Catholic faith.  Among the nine children were:

James Augustine Healy (1830-1900)

 

 

 

 

 

1. James Augustine Healy (1830-1900) -Though not as documented as his brothers, James did found the Healy legacy of achievement.  He graduated from the College of the Holy Cross in 1849.  In 1875, Healy became the first African-American Roman Catholic bishop, as he was installed as Bishop of Portland, Maine.   James oversaw the establishment of 60 new churches, 68 missions, 18 convents and 18 schools.

Patrick Francis Healy (1834-1910)

 

2. Patrick Francis Healy (1834-1910) – Patrick Healy is a personal favorite of mine, as he is connected to my alma mater.  Patrick graduated Holy Cross in 1850, and then entered the Jesuit order.  The Jesuits, fearing that his race would be an issue in the states, sent Patrick to the University of Louvain, in Belgium.  He became the first African-American to earn a PhD–NOT W.E.B. Du Bois as commonly believed.  In 1866 Healy became dean of Georgetown University.  In 1874, Patrick became president of Georgetown, the first African-American of a major, white-majority university in the United States.  As president, Healy modernized the curriculum by requiring courses in the sciences, particularly chemistry and physics. He even expanded and upgraded the schools of law and medicine.  Patrick’s influence was so far-reaching that he is hailed as Georgetown’s “second founder”, after founder John Carroll.

 

Michael Augustine Healy (1839-1904)

3. Michael Augustine Healy (1839-1904) -Michael, who ditched Holy Cross for a life at sea, did not follow his older brothers’ path to the priesthood.  Michael joined a British ship as a cabin boy in 1854.  In 1864, Abraham Lincoln signed Michael’s commission as a Third Lieutenant in the Revenue Cutter Service, which would later become the United States Coast Guard.  Healy patrolled the 20,000 miles of Alaskan coastline for more than 20 years, earning great respect of the natives and seafarers alike. After commercial fishing had depleted the whale and seal populations, his assistance with introduction of Siberian reindeer helped prevent starvation among the native Alaskans.  He became the first African-American to attain the rank of captain of the Coast Guard in 1880.  In 1882, he became the first African-American to captain a US government ship.  His life inspired Jack London’s novel the Sea-Wolf, as well as James Michener’s Alaska.

All of these men achieved “firsts” for African-Americans, yet few scholars and even fewer African-Americans acknowledge their accomplishments.  The reasons are simple: they often did not openly recognize their African roots, and they were Catholic. 

The Healys were light-skinned: they “passed” for white as long as their lineage was not questioned.  Yet none of them openly denied their mother’s heritage.  Patrick Healy, in fact, was unashamed to acknowledge his African blood if questioned, even though he was president of a college with a large Southern white population. 

The Catholic aspect was part of a general bias against Catholics in America through most of the 19th Century.  In fact, it could be said that the Healys were equally, if not more, held back by their religion as they were by their race. 

Yet regardless of their race or their religion, it was a shame that their achievements have lacked recognition.  This February, let’s hope the Healys attain their deserved place among the pantheon of African-American heroes.

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