Tag Archives: Michelle Rhee

A Letter to Andrew Cuomo: Mr. D for New York’s new P-12 Assistant Education Secretary

English: New York State Capitol viewed from th...

English: New York State Capitol viewed from the south, located on the north end of the Empire State Plaza in Albany, New York (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dear Governor Cuomo:

I hear that you’re losing one of your top advisors to…law school?

May I ask, do you recruit from the kiddie pool?  May I suggest your next interview be during adult swim?

When I heard of Katie Campos’ departure as Cuomo’s P-12 Assistant Education Secretary, I wasn’t surprised.  I mean, how much can a 20-something who has NO experience in the classroom, NOR in administering a school building know about New York’s arcane system?

Let me repeat that—she was never in a classroom.

She was never even a principal.

She was never a TFA drone, a Teaching Fellow, a Broad Fellow or any of the other alternative programs that the reform crowd love to tout as “experience.”

Michelle Rhee, Richard Barth, Geoffrey Canada…I have my issues with these people, but at least they had some real knowledge of the trenches of education.

Campos spent her three years between college graduation and her Albany post as nothing more than a political apparatchik, from Democrats for Education Reform to the New York State Charter Schools Association.  That’s akin to letting the late Ted Kennedy be principal of a girls’ high school—probably inept, and possibly disastrous.

And she was your “most experienced” team member?  I hear the lamentations of a thousand pairs of soiled undergarments.

So for Campos’ replacement, I humbly urge you, our esteemed governor, to select someone with experience, commitment, passion and above all a vested interest in education.

Someone like me.

Now, besides being ravishingly handsome, I do bring some important skills to the table.  So before I start sending my resume up to Albany, a few bullet points to strengthen my case:

  1. Classroom experience – I’m up on Ms. Campos by nine years in that department.  In my near-decade in the classroom, I’ve seen special education kids, English Language Learners, kids in trouble with the law, kids experimenting with drugs and sex, foster kids, homeless kids, kids on the run from abusive parents…you name it.  I’ve managed to reach a lot of them (NOT all…I wouldn’t pretend like that) and in the process, gotten to know what works and what doesn’t work for kids, parents, and teachers.
  2. Bipartisanship – Why not appoint a Republican to your team, Governor?  Especially an elephant like me with a long memory and (most importantly) an open mind to new ideas. I may have an “R” next to my name, but I’m not some Tea Party nincompoop, nor am I a Wall Street goon. After four years as an undergrad in DC, crossing the aisle is really no big thing; it’s more of a matter of getting the right mix of ideas that can help solve the problem.
  3. Honest feedback about current reforms – Testing, Common Core, teacher evaluations, class size: the big four in terms of gripes and controversies (if I’m missing something, let me know).  How about getting feedback from someone who has worked with and worked to implement your reforms at its base level?  The reform poobahs will gladly generate the spreadsheets and charts to keep you happy—but are they being upfront with you?  At least I can give an answer based on those who actually utilize these programs, rather than the bean counters who collect whatever data is given to them.
  4. A balanced approach to the Common Core – speaking of the Common Core, unlike many of the opposition, I really have no beef with these standards per se.  In fact, in several instances they serve as a necessary clarifier for benchmarks that were extremely vague and open to interpretation.  The Common Core is not the problem; implementation is.  The inconsistent nature of Common Core adoption—followed by ramrod exams that were clearly shown to be flawed—indicates a more nuanced approach to the problem.  It’ll be slower, but much more effective in the long run.
  5. A “people person” who gets along with teachers, students, administrators, unions and kids – The “carrot-and-stick” approach only goes so far in New York state among certain places: the “stick” might work in those districts where the opportunities are slim and teachers take what they can get.  Yet there are also places (NYC, Rochester, etc.) that just laugh at the stick and whip out a bigger one.  Whatever programs that need to implemented, the initial phases will be painful.  Don’t make it more painful by using ed reform blowhards who patronize teachers and keep harping that it’s all “for the children.”  We all know it’s for the kids—at least it’s supposed to be.  Send someone who can reach the best in all sides, who can bring people together instead of drive them apart.
  6. A good-looking guy – did I forget to mention I’m ravishingly handsome?  I was on TV, for Pete’s sake.

With a CV like that, there isn’t a statehouse in America that wouldn’t want me on their team, right?

If you are interested, Governor Cuomo, my LinkedIn profile is right here, and I can be reached through this blog or at my email ldorazio1@gmail.com.  I look forward to hearing from you.

Give my best to Sandra Lee (that was from Future Mrs. D).

Sincerely,

Mr. D

PS: If per chance you request an interview, please make sure it’s a nice day as Future Mrs. D enjoys the drive to Albany.

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Join Mr. D at the Save Our Schools March in DC July 30

While others may soak up the sun this summer vacation, Mr. D will be sweltering in the swamps of the Potomac–for an important cause.

This summer, the Neighborhood will be joining educators across this country in a nationwide call to save public education in America.  The Save our Schools March and National Call to Action will take place in Washington, DC this July 28-31.  It is a gathering of educators, concerned parents, activists and journalists demanding an end to the destructive policies of the education establishment–policies placed in the guise of education “reform.”

In specific, the goals of the March are (according to their website):

  • Equitable funding for all public school communities
  • An end to high stakes testing for student, teacher, and school evaluation
  • Curriculum developed for and by local school communities
  • Teacher and community leadership in forming public education policies

Now these are goals we can all get behind.  Unfortunately, much of the policies of the education reformers like Michelle Rhee and Arne Duncan (both covered here at the Neighborhood) have hindered, rather than helped our goal of a quality education for ALL Americans.

The weekend features seminars, workshops, lectures and a get-together for education writers and bloggers on July 29–and yours truly will be there IN PERSON to greet all his colleagues and fans.  Join me the next day as the Neighborhood will be marching to the Ellipse at noon, where education heavy-hitters like Diane Ravitch, Jonathan Kozol, Deborah Maier, Jose Vilson and many others will rile up the crowds.

At two, we then head to ol’ Arne’s office at the Department of Education, to give him a taste of that old time religion known as “public education.”

Now, Mr. D doesn’t mind tooting his own horn and beating his own drum…but if he did it alone, it would make him look like a lunatic.  Here’s where you come in.

Linked here is an RSVP site to join the March on July 30.  If you want, you can also register for events on the other days of the conference.  The RSVP doesn’t obligate you to go, but it helps the organizers get a head count so they can print numbers that would make Arne soil his enormous jock strap.

At any rate, I want the Neighborhood to have a strong presence on the Mall July 30.  Join me and thousands of others in fighting to save public education in America.

At the very least, you can meet me in person–and tell me what a bullshit artist I am right to my face ;)

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The Ham-Fisted Problem in the Wisconsin Union Crisis

Protesters at Wisconsin State Capitol, from cnn.com

It’s one of many mantras here at the Neighborhood—in a democracy, style matters as much as (if not more than) substance.

We’ve seen it in Obama’s election. We’ve seen it in Michelle Rhee’s unceremonious exit from the DC public schools. We’re seeing it now as Republicans and Democrats are held to a stand-off in Wisconsin over cuts to public unions—and America, as always, is quick to take sides.

Last week, the GOP-dominated Wisconsin legislature began voting on budget measures that would’ve stripped public employee unions of most of their collective bargaining rights, packaging it as a cost-saving measure in response to the current economic condition. The Democratic minority, rather than vote a pyrrhic negative on a rubber-stamp vote, fled the state, leaving the legislature without a quorum.

The Republicans will not compromise. The Democrats, backed by labor unions, will not back down. The state capital of Madison is a war zone with protesters. Similar scenes are playing out in Indiana and maybe in Ohio.

Pundits have, obviously, opined at length on this. Right now, I’m not concerned about the rightward shift in the politics of the Middle West, as many have brought up. Nor am I looking at the declining power of unions as a base of support for the Democratic Party.

What bothers me is the horrible way this situation got to this point. Unfortunately, both sides are to blame.

Back in the flush times, the pre-2008 meltdown days, many state governments, in an effort to cozy up to their public sector unions, proposed contracts that included ludicrously lavish packages: zero-contribution options for pensions, health benefits for nearly nothing, and annuity funds at hilariously high rates. The unions, sensing this was the time to cash in, willfully signed on to these contracts, packaging them as a victory for the members.

Furthermore, in many states, pattern bargaining made the situation worse. Under pattern bargaining, the state’s contract negotiations are based on the precedent of the contracts presented to the other public unions in the state. So if the police and fire unions were rewarded handsomely, then the teachers and health workers want a similar piece of the pie—it’s only fair.

But what happens when the well runs dry?

The economic crisis of state government is a collective problem (no pun intended). It was caused by a severe shortsightedness on the part of governments both state and municipal, both political parties, unions, government contractors and the business sector.

The fundamental rule of the economic cycle is that the good times never last—and when it comes to economics, government is a slow learner.

That being said, the solution proposed by the Wisconsin legislature—backed by Tea Party-aligned GOP governor Scott Walker—is akin to hacking off a limb with an ax instead of a scalpel.

Hopefully, many states are negotiating with their state employees and unions (key word: NEGOTIATING) on creating contract solutions that solve the mistakes of the past. As a unit, unions need to take initiative in preparing their membership for the worst—and proposing austerity packages to the state that are both prudent and self-sustaining at the same time. States, furthermore, must be both blunt in their assessment of the situation to their workforce and open to solutions that can solve the problem with as little economic bloodshed as possible.

Wisconsin Republicans are not doing that. They are out to neuter public unions, once and for all…and it will bite them in the ass.

Regardless of their employer, workers have a right to organize and negotiate with their management. Many people, particularly Jonah Goldberg in a recent Los Angeles Times column, make a distinction between public- and private-sector unions. They see public employees as foregoing collective bargaining for job security—and that the unions themselves are merely a political ploy while the old-guard AFL-CIO unions are more worthy of praise.

Those who make this distinction have a short memory.

What Goldberg and his ilk seem to misunderstand is that public sector unions are not only federal and state employees. The thousands of American municipalities have had workers that fought for their rights well before the rise of government worker unions under the Kennedy administration. Teachers, for example, have fought for better wages and conditions in New York since the turn of the century. Same with police, fire fighters, etc. Many public unions even predate their more “worthy” private antecedents.

Secondly, if the privatization of public services comes to pass, as so many in the right feel must happen, guess what happens to those public unions? They become PRIVATE unions, just like the Teamsters, the electrical workers and so on. The unions will not go away.

Thus, strong-arming basic collective bargaining, even with a working majority, wins no brownie points. Like in economics, in politics the good times don’t last.

The Wisconsin legislature will probably get their vote (even though the courts will weigh in inevitably). The governor may even have his union-busting victory. Now what? How does that make Wisconsin look to other teachers, policemen or government workers who want to work there? Besides a brain drain, Wisconsin will probably suffer shortfalls in hiring, once the economic cycle picks up. Who would want to work in a state that treats them like cattle?

The solution to economic problems is seldom easy and never painless. The state has to be honest about its situation and open to all suggestions—including compromises. The unions have to be upfront with their membership and with management about the sacrifices that need to be made—including compromises. Lawmakers have to find that middle ground that democracy depends on—a middle ground that includes compromise.

If one side refuses to compromise (like in Wisconsin), then short-term victories can turn into long-term catastrophes.

And a final message for Governor Walker: if you insist on treating public employees like cattle to squeeze out a tax cut, go ahead… Just don’t say I didn’t warn you about the stampede that’s coming.

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